Prius Personal Log  #820

July 9, 2017  -  July 11, 2017

Last Updated: Sat. 10/21/2017

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7-11-2017

Statistics.  Now that things are settling down at home with the 2 new Prime and the 2 new chargers, it's time to start gathering some easily sharable real-world data.  For example, how much recharging can you achieve in just 1 hour?  Today, I measured... though I missed my timer by 2 minutes.  So, after 1 hour and 2 minutes, I have something to share.  Starting from empty, the battery-pack was able to utilize 3.66 kWh of electricity.  This is data shown on my phone, using the app that connects via Wi-Fi to the charger.  In the Prime itself, the charge-level stated it was at 62%.  I bet that isn't what you were expecting.  Since a full recharge takes 2 hours, most people assume half would be 50%.  But in reality, the charging isn't linear.  You get more electricity initially, then it tampers down.  That gradual drop as it reaches "full" is part of the longevity approach.  It doesn't put as much demand on the chemicals within.  Another part of that is "full" not actually being full.  When it states 100% on the display, it is really about 85% of the battery-pack's actual capacity potential.  Not recharging entirely helps prolong life too.  Anywho, that 62% on the display worked out to a EV distance estimate of 21.3 miles.  Not bad for just a little over 1 hour of charging.

7-11-2017

Emissions.  Notice how no value whatsoever in the comments is placed on the reduction of smog-related emissions?  That's really a sad statement about priorities.  Sadly, I've said it countless times over the past 17 years too.  Almost none of the reviews ever take them into account.  Focus entirely on efficiency payoff is such a waste.  Since when do those driving guzzlers care anyway?  It's all just a stall tactic.  They know they'll ultimately lose.  You can only ignore the younger generation for so long.  For the perspective of our children, it simply makes no sense not embracing new technology.  It's an expectation in their mind.  A constant state of improvement is the norm.  Imagine never upgrading your phone.  Gasp!  When a better technology comes along, you replace the old with the new.  Why in the world would you keep buying the old.  That kind of purchase makes no sense.  Yet, we see that with the traditional vehicles.  Buyers pretend there isn't a better choice available.  Ugh.

7-10-2017

Two Vehicles.  The topic of "streetlight charging" came up yesterday.  Coincidently, I had actually just witnessed that.  It's a nice opportunity to take advantage of, when offered.  Unfortunately, it isn't an convenient as you might think.  Not all charging ports are located in the same place.  Some have them in front.  Some have them by the driver's door.  Some have them by the passenger rear.  It varies, which means parking situations will be beneficial to some more than others.  For Prime, being able to park next to a streetlight, then plug into it is no big deal.  The port is on the needed side.  For Leaf, it's port in front could take advantage of the opportunity too.  But with a GM or Ford plug-in, the cord would have to be wrapped around the car and the charging handle stick out into traffic.  That's obviously not good.  But rather than stress that awkward placement in a circumstance some may never even witness, I thought it would be better to bring up a far more realistic situation.  What do you do at home when there are 2 vehicle sharing the same garage?  Hanging a cord from the ceiling may be an option, though the cord would still be in the way at times.  For us with having 2 plug-in vehicles, it worked out really nice.  Here's what I shared & asked:  My wife parks her Prime on the right side of the garage, to allow maximum room for the driver's door.  I back in on the left for the same reason.  That makes plugging in very easy for both and completely eliminates stepping over cords.  It also makes plugging in while parked in the driveway possible.  How are other 2 plug-in vehicle homes dealing with recharging?

7-10-2017

Timing Gamble.  Toyota's decision to not use up tax-credits with gen-1 is paying off.  Pointing that out today sure stirred the pot.  Discussion branched all over the place.  There was confusion, denial, and some lashing out.  What a mess.  The worry that GM would screw up consumer perception like they did with diesel decades back was warranted.  They rolled out such a terrible product, it disenchanted the entire market.  Diesel was all but totally abandoned as a result.  Fear of that happening with EV came about for the same reason with EV1.  Thankfully, the claim of there not being any consumer demand was exposed as farce.  They did still mess up perception though.  This is why Toyota keeps their distance.  If fallout comes, they won't suffer from it.  The gamble of waiting sure looks like a good one.  Claiming were that timing is "too late" don't hold merit.  The market as a whole is only now starting to notice plug-in vehicles.  Those ordinary consumers who just want a reliable form of transportation for a good price are the great untouched still.  They have yet to begin research.  Actual shopping is still a few years off.  Until they start seeing them on the road and noticing public charging-stations, the game of sales hasn't really begun.  That's why saving the bulk of tax-credits for now makes so much sense.  Toyota chose wisely.  GM on the other hand, has almost used them all up already.  Oops!  It's like sprinting early in the race.  You end up tired long before anything important even happens.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, flat sales.  The most irritating of shortcomings with GM's struggle for Volt has always been the most important.  It's sales, which have been flat.  The most recent month's outcome was just 1,745.  That isn't any improvement over the previous generation.  Growth has not be achieved.  Each report just adds to the stream of disappointment.  Witnessing the continued lack of progress is how such misrepresentation has gotten so out of hand.  The enthusiasts have run out of options.  There is literally nothing else to work with.  What else can be said at this point?  Every imaginable argument has already taken place.  It's over.  They just don't what to acknowledge it yet.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, resentment.  It's getting intense.  GM set the goal of 60,000 annual for good reason... and the enthusiasts know it.  They've got nothing else left to defend their lost cause though.  So, there's lot of posting going on to dissuade its importance.  If find it intriguing what they'll claim.  Simple dismissal doesn't always work.  They have to get creative about missed goals.  It's often a reinterpretation of what was stated.  That's why I so clearly document comments from when we first hear of something.  Anyone can distort long afterward with some degree of success.  But back when it first happened, that's extremely difficult... especially if you saved the exact quotes from those in favor of what was said.  You can later catch that same person changing their story later... which is where the resentment comes from.  Some get really upset from you using their own words against time.  We'll too bad.  I'm not going to allow their misrepresentation to continue.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, repetition.  It's rather remarkable to see so many of the same old nonsense resurface again.  There's no point to following the path it take us this time though, since all of that research is complete.  The antagonists of the past provided information to steer away from the same traps the next time around.  That's how you avoid repeating the same mistakes.  I learned.  They didn't.  It's so simple.  Just pay attention, then remember.  In fact, if you are reading this, you know how I remember.  Taking the time to document the detail as it was playing out is the source of study material later.  Watch for patterns.  React based upon what the past taught us.  Don't just try the same old thing again.  Ugh.  Seeing that repetition play out another time is truly remarkable.  Those who don't learn from failures of the past are doomed to repeat it.  I summarized the absurdity of the situation with:  Volt never attracted GM's own loyal customers, hence the "who" question in the past and the tax-credits having been wasted by conquest sales.  You can continue playing the game...  There is 10 years of that spin to work with.  Read up on that history.  You'll be surprised by the similarity... and lack of progress.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, disagree.  The effort to get me to compromise was not going well.  You could tell there was growing frustration related to my unmovable stance.  It has been 10 years.  Being told GM would leap-frog the competition gets old... when it never actually happens.  Even with a $7,500 subsidy, the mainstream sales we had been promised never materialized.  They didn't understand the market.  They had no idea how many challenges Toyota had actually overcome.  GM continues to struggle... which would be fine if there was an effort to address the problems, then they too could overcome them.  It's not unrealistic.  It's quite reasonable.  The catch is to shallow pride so direction can be changed.  Acknowledging efforts had been targeted the wrong way is how you get back on track.  Pretending their isn't a problem doesn't help.  I'm not going to agree that all is fine, that we only have to be patient.  Waiting for a product not targeted at mainstream consumers doesn't make sense, as I replied:  No, I don't agree.  The goal of "nicely under $30,000" was set an entire decade ago and promised for gen-1... then gen-2... now gen-3.  No more excuses.  Toyota already delivered a MSRP of $27,100 for a base model Prime loaded with safety features.  Camry, RAV4, and C-HR hybrids are all being positioned for plug-in models.  No more delay.  Why must we continue to wait for GM to catch up, despite having such a supposed huge lead?  Where is the affordable model?  What is the plan?  Who is the market?  When will traditional vehicles finally be replaced?

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, who?  Pressing the reset button each time something new rolls out is how shortcomings are concealed.  When I called out the antagonist, he tried to spin it right back with: "Why such a desperate effort to ignore/exclude/marginalize key feature differences between the the Prime and the Volt?"  I wasn't about to take his bait.  I'm not going to press the button.  The goal will remain fixed upon traditional vehicle replacement, period.  None of the conquest nonsense is acceptable.  So, I jumped right back into the routine of retaining focus by asking:  Who is the market for Volt?  That question has been asked countless times over the past 7 years.  The answer was always the same.  GM was targeting Volt for conquest sales.  That's why the red herring of Prius verses Volt has persisted.  Enthusiasts couldn't care less about actually changing GM's own loyal customers.  All attention was placed on winning over new buyers instead.  What a terrible waste of tax-credits, squandering them away for the sake of bragging rights rather than actually replacing traditional vehicles.  We continue to be told to be patient, yet no progress is actually being made with the replacement.  Cruze, Malibu, and Equinox owners keep replacing their old models with new models.  Volt isn't of any interest to them.  Say whatever the heck you want about Prius or Toyota.  The problem for GM isn't going away. A void & Distract only works for so long.  The product-line must change.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, excuses.  It never ends.  The concern over "too little, too slowly" has been overwhelmingly validated.  Time is rapidly running out and some continue to make excuses.  I'm in utter amazement how enthusiasts are becoming apologists.  That was unexpected.  They see what's happening and try to defend it.  Unfortunately, all that does is soften the impact.  The inevitable failure to achieve goals will still happen.  You'll just feel better about having been so wrong.  Even writing about it makes me uncomfortable.  Knowing the purpose of replacing traditional vehicles will have been missed by not addressing shortcomings is a big let down.  You learn from mistakes and move on... not make excuses!  Ugh.  Oh well.  It's not like warnings weren't provided:  Tax-Credits will trigger phaseout next year for GM and you're making excuses for delay of dealing with the situation.  We need affordable choices now.  The dependency upon subsidies to compete will come to a painful end and refusing to deal with it by portraying the market as a tiny niche is unacceptable.  Refusal to acknowledge mainstream buyers through redirection of "EV curious consumers" is denial of the need to replace traditional vehicles quickly.  Your claim of "They aren't comparing Cruze or Malibu to Volt" supports that.  They simply don't bother.  Why waste time on a expensive compact specialty vehicle?  Look at purchase priorities of ordinary consumers.  So what if Toyota did a much better job of matching Prime to them and GM didn't with Volt?  That's no reason to deny their importance.  Sighting reasons to wait is not a good plan.  Like it or not, next year's phaseout trigger is coming.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, purpose.  All I can say is "Wow!"  After those many exchanges, he continued to be belligerent.  Outright dismissal of doing anything to misrepresent is a blatant sign of concern.  That lashing out is the panic we witness whenever something goes horribly wrong and all other opportunities have been exhausted.  This is how I decided to end the nonsense:  YOU ARE COMPLETELY MISSING THE POINT OF THE TECHNOLOGY.  IT IS NOT FOR AUTOMAKERS TO COMPETE WITH EACH OTHER.  THE PURPOSE OF THE TECHNLOGY IS TO REPLACE TRADITIONAL VEHICLES.  Got it?  Do you honestly think a customer shopping the dealer's showroom floor looking for a GM vehicle is going to care whether or not that Volt there in front of them is better than a Prime?  No, they won't.  That ordinary mainstream consumer will be comparing that Volt to a Cruze or Malibu, other vehicles from GM's own product line.  It boggles the mind how PURPOSE OF THE TECHNOLOGY is completely overlooked for the sake of bragging rights.  Our market's obsession with winning small battles has the consequence of losing the war.  Traditional vehicles must be replaced with choices that are actually competitive.  A simple look at the MSRP of Volt causes that shopper to walk away.  That is a fact you continue to evade.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, power.  Since way back when Volt first rolled out, the thought was power would overcome all other shortcomings.  That approached failed to attract anyone beyond niche buyers.  Mainstream consumers simply aren't willing to pay a premium for power.  They obviously like it, but that is far from a leading priority.  Their purchase decision falls upon other much more important factors.  Nonetheless, they keep trying and keep failing.  Our drive to dinner with friends last night provided yet another great example of how their effort to undermine falls desperately short.  In reply the latest effort, I posted:  My wife floored it yesterday in her Prime to pass someone on the highway who clearly didn't place driving as a priority.  For our safety, she wanted to get past them quickly.  We shot up to 75 MPH effortlessly, never triggering the engine.  It was all EV.  There's nothing else to clarify.  No gas was consumed to supply that burst of speed.

7-09-2017

Misrepresentation, doubt.  The technique of raising doubt has been a very effective means of undermining for decades.  You don't want your product harmed by new evidence of a problem, you raise doubt.  We saw that for many, many years about smoking.  We've seen the same thing for climate change.  When facts are diluted or dismissed, it gives pause to the effort to deal with the problem.  That delay is exactly what the antagonist wants.  They know an end is coming.  Slowing it's progress is all they have left.  We're certainly seeing that now with the introduction of affordable plug-in choices.  The expensive ones unable to reach their intended demographic are in trouble.  With this misrepresentation, we are witnessing attacks on Prime by Volt enthusiasts.  They know that when Hyundai's new offering, the plug-in hybrid model of Ioniq, pressure will grow significantly... especially since GM will also be facing the phaseout of tax-credits at the same time.  I kept the discussion going with:  Again, you are misrepresenting.  This time, by posting moot points.  The use of "more" and "longer" and "some" are all extremely vague, which leaves the reader concerned by raising doubt.  Taking advantage of assumptions is a common tactic for undermining.  The purpose of a PLUG-IN HYBRID is to significantly reduce consumption, not to eliminate it.  So what it the engine briefly runs.  That's what it is there for.  By repeatedly posting the message over and over again to create a stigma, you are misleading people about what the system was designed to deliver.  You get an extremely efficient gas engine to supplement the smaller battery-pack.  It is not an emergency backup.  It is there to supply power when desired.  If you want to save electricity for later, generate electricity while driving, or get an extra boost for high-demand use, the engine is readily available.  The spin about purpose has become quite evident.  We see what's happening.  It misrepresents.

 

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